Jackie Stewart

 
Jackie Stewart drove for more than four minutes towards the end of the German GP with a broken wrist. He won that race. |  Stewart missed his final Grand Prix in USA due to an accident. It would have been his 100th Grand Prix. |  Between 1997 and 1999, Stewart was the team principal of his team, Stewart Grand Prix, which he started with his son Paul

FACTFILE

Name: Jackie Stewart
Nickname: The Flying Scot
DOB: Jun 11 1939
Place Of Birth: Dumbarton, Scotland
Nationality: British
Most Races For: Tyrrell - 39
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  • MILESTONES
PROFILE
Jackie Stewart

John Stewart, also known as “Jackie” was not only born with a silver spoon in his mouth but also had his racing instincts served on a platter and he could dig in that silver spoon anytime he liked. Born on 11 June, 1939 in Milton, Dunbartonshire, this Scottish worked as an apprentice mechanic in his family business of Jaguar dealership. Like any young boy looks up to his father or maybe his elder brother, Jackie had both his father, who was an amateur motorcycle racer and his brother Jimmy, a racer for Ecurie Ecosse to draw inspiration from. When his brother was injured in a crash at Le Mans, his parents discouraged the idea of buttressing their second son in motor racing and he was made to take up shooting instead.

In 1964, he was crowned the Formula Three Champion while racing for Tyrrell even though Cooper had earlier offered him a Formula One seat which he conveniently chose to refuse, for this very title. Colin Chapman and Jim Clark, two well known figures from the Lotus team were hard to impress for their stiff upper-lipped demeanor, but not for Jackie who caught their eye when he tried out the Lotus 33-Climax. Not one who liked to be told what to do, Stewart did it again when he refused to race for Lotus in Formula One, a prospect for which many drivers would be ready to give an arm. He chose to take a step at a time and agreed to race the Lotus in Formula Two instead.

In 1965, Jackie felt he was ready to take on the Formula One world and in just his first season with the Owen Racing Organization he confounded everyone with his five podium finishes and third position on the drivers’ charts.
Maybe it was the change of engine from the BRM V8 to the BRM H16 or his style of driving that hurdled Jackie, who was on song right from the word “go” in the following two seasons of 1966 and 1967. After winning the Monaco Grand Prix in 1966, Jackie was involved in a disastrous accident and just cheated death when he was trapped in his upturned car and fuel leaked all over it. He finished seventh that season and ninth in 1967.

Referred to as “The Flying Scot”, Jackie’s wins in Zandvoort and Nurburgring in the 1968 season of Formula One came under rain-drenched circumstances but his drive to victory in Nurburgring is still commended as the greatest ever. In 1968 he had moved to Matra International which belonged to Tyrrell and had the Ford Cosworth DFV engines. With four podium results Jackie was second in the drivers’ standings, his best since his debut. Seven podium finishes, six wins, 63 points and the World Championship title – The Flying Scot reached the highest altitude in his flight to the championship in 1969. It was the start of a new era in F1, the reigns of which would be held by this dynamic Scotsman.

In 1970, Matra was taken over by Chrysler who insisted on engine changes but Tyrrell and Jackie stuck to their guns and kept the Ford Cosworths but not without the chassis being changed to the ones provided by March Engineering. This however unfolded as a bad combination and Jackie was outrun by the Lotus in more races. He finished fifth in the Drivers’ Championship and managed four podium results.
The final three years of Jackie’s career were with the Elf Team Tyrrell and with quintessentially the same Ford Cosworth DFV engines. With this victorious setup, he went on to win two more World Championship titles in 1971 when he scored 62 points, 7 podium finishes and later in 1973, which can be rendered as his most spectacular season to win the title starred with 10 podium finishes and a career high of 71 points.

Jackie Stewart retired as a Formula One driver after his historic 1973 season but did not bid adieu to the sport. He plays the role of a Racing Safety Advocate in F1. He was particularly disturbed with the lack of facilities of doctors and ambulances in 1966 at Spa-Francorchamps when he was stuck under his car for almost 25 minutes with no tool to assist his escape. Since he has taken over this job to ensure safety, seatbelts, helmets and on-duty doctors have become obvious safety features on an F1 race track.

Formula One can be ever thankful to this three time World Champion for adding to the glory of this pinnacle of motorsports and also ensuring that it always remains in “safe” hands.

-Anup Pareek


  • YEARS
  • TEAMS
  • ENGINES
  • GPs
  • CIRCUITS
STATISTICS
YEARS
YearTeamClaGPs WinsPolesPods FLsPts
1965BRM3rd10105034
1966BRM7th8101014
1967BRM9th11002010
1968Matra2nd10304236
1969Matra1st11627563
1970Tyrrell, March5th13144025
1971Tyrrell1st11667362
1972Tyrrell2nd11425445
1973Tyrrell1st14538171
Total 9927174315360

Jackie Stewart - HEAD TO HEAD (TEAM-MATES)

Jackie Stewart - Season Performance

According to stats...

  • Jackie Stewart drove for more than four minutes towards the end of the German GP with a broken wrist. He won that race.
  • Stewart missed his final Grand Prix in USA due to an accident. It would have been his 100th Grand Prix.
  • Between 1997 and 1999, Stewart was the team principal of his team, Stewart Grand Prix, which he started with his son Paul

QUOTES ON JACKIE STEWART

"I would have been a much more popular World Champion if I had always said what people wanted to hear. I might have been dead, but definitely more popular."
-Jackie Stewart



OTHER DRIVERS

Most successful drivers to have raced with Jackie Stewart